Whatever took place to Interracial Love? by Kathleen Collins review – black power and pathos

Whatever took place to Interracial Love? by Kathleen Collins review – black power and pathos

Written through the 1960s and 70s, these posthumously posted stories from the civil liberties activist and film-maker seem startlingly prescient

Revolutionary fervour … Kathleen Collins. Photograph: Douglas Collins

Revolutionary fervour … Kathleen Collins. Photograph: Douglas Collins

Last modified on Thu 22 Feb 2021 12.45 GMT

W hen in 1975 Alice Walker, working as an editor on Ms. Magazine in New York, received a batch of stories from an unknown author, there must-have been a moment of recognition: like Walker, fledgling author Kathleen Collins ended up being black colored, tertiary educated, a previous civil rights activist and had married a white guy.

Walker’s tardy response – “We kept these such a long time because we liked them plenty … I wanted to get them as a set” – could not disguise the courteous rejection that followed. For three years the tales kept the business of woodlice in a trunk where Collins’s forgotten manuscripts lay yellowing and undisturbed. Now, through happenstance plus the determination of her daughter, readers might be since amazed when I ended up being by the rich selection of the seasoned voice that is literary modern, confident, emotionally smart and funny – that emerges through the pages associated with the posthumously published Whatever Happened to Interracial appreciate? Sigue leyendo